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  3. Full text of "Quotable Poems An Anthology Of Modern Verse Volume Two"
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  5. 125 198
  6.  
  7.  
  8.  
  9. POEMS
  10.  
  11.  
  12.  
  13. VOLUME TWO
  14.  
  15.  
  16.  
  17. QUOTABLE POEMS
  18.  
  19. An Ant h o I o gy of
  20. Modern Verse
  21.  
  22.  
  23.  
  24. VOLUME TWO
  25.  
  26. COMPILED BY
  27.  
  28. THOMAS CURTIS CLARK
  29.  
  30.  
  31.  
  32. i
  33.  
  34.  
  35.  
  36.  
  37. WILLETT, CLARK & COMPANY
  38. CHICAGO NEW YORK
  39.  
  40. 1931
  41.  
  42.  
  43.  
  44. Copyright 193 i by
  45. WILLETT, CLARK & COMPANY
  46.  
  47.  
  48.  
  49. Manufactured in The U. S. A. by The Plimpton Frew
  50. Norwood, Mass.-LaPorte, Ind.
  51.  
  52.  
  53.  
  54. To My Brother
  55. CHARLES PATTON CLARK
  56.  
  57. MEDICAL SCIENTIST
  58.  
  59. AND
  60. LOVER OF BEAUTY
  61.  
  62.  
  63.  
  64. CONTENTS
  65.  
  66. The poems in this volume are deliberately placed without
  67. attempt to classify them either as to subject or author.
  68. Pages 1-324 contain 560 poems selected for their quotability,
  69. modern tone, and genuine poetic quality. Readers who de-
  70. sire to find poems on any particular theme will find ample
  71. guidance in the very complete indexes beginning on page
  72. 325, including
  73.  
  74. (a) Index of Subjects, pp. 325 to 336.
  75.  
  76. (b) Index of Authors, pp. 337 to 348.
  77.  
  78. (c) Index of Titles, pp. 349 to 358.
  79.  
  80. (d) Index of First Lines, pp. 359 to 366.
  81.  
  82. Detailed acknowledgment to authors and publishers will
  83. also be found on p. 367.
  84.  
  85.  
  86.  
  87. vii
  88.  
  89.  
  90.  
  91. QUOTABLE
  92. POEMS
  93.  
  94. VOLUME TWO
  95.  
  96.  
  97.  
  98. They Went Forth to Battle but They
  99. Always Fell
  100.  
  101. They went forth to battle but they always fell.
  102. Something they saw above the sullen shields.
  103. Nobly they fought and bravely, but not well,
  104. And sank heart-wounded by a subtle spell.
  105. They knew not fear that to the foeman yields,
  106. They were not weak, as one who vainly wields
  107. A faltering weapon; yet the old tales tell
  108. How on the hard-fought field they always fell.
  109.  
  110. It was a secret music that they heard,
  111.  
  112. The murmurous voice of pity and of peace,
  113.  
  114. And that which pierced the heart was but a word,
  115.  
  116. Though the white breast was red-lipped where the sword
  117.  
  118. Pressed a fierce cruel kiss and did not cease
  119.  
  120. Till its hot thirst was surfeited. Ah these
  121.  
  122. By an unwarlike troubling doubt were stirred,
  123.  
  124. And died for hearing what no foeman heard.
  125.  
  126. They went forth to battle but they always fell.
  127. Their might was not the might of lifted spears.
  128. Over the battle-clamor came a spell
  129. Of troubling music, and they fought not well.
  130. Their wreaths are willows and their tribute, tears.
  131. Their names are old sad stories in men's ears.
  132. Yet they will scatter the red hordes of Hell,
  133. Who went to battle forth and always fell.
  134.  
  135. Shaemas O'Sheel
  136.  
  137.  
  138.  
  139. QUOTABLE POEMS
  140.  
  141.  
  142.  
  143. Opportunity
  144.  
  145. In an old city by the storied shores,
  146.  
  147. Where the bright summit of Olympus soars,
  148.  
  149. A cryptic statue mounted toward the light
  150.  
  151. Heel-winged, tip-toed, and poised for instant flight.
  152.  
  153. " statue, tell your name," a traveler cried;
  154.  
  155. And solemnly the marble lips replied:
  156.  
  157. " Men call me Opportunity, I lift
  158.  
  159. My wing&d feet from earth to show how swift
  160.  
  161. My flight, how short my stay
  162.  
  163. How Fate is ever waiting on the way."
  164.  
  165. " But why that tossing ringlet on your brow? "
  166. " That men may seize me any moment: Now,
  167. Now is my other name; today my date;
  168. O traveler, tomorrow is too late!"
  169.  
  170. Edwin Markham
  171.  
  172.  
  173.  
  174. Prayer
  175.  
  176. God, though this life is but a wraith,
  177. Although we know not what we use;
  178.  
  179. Although we grope with little faith,
  180. God, give me the heart to fight and lose.
  181.  
  182. Ever insurgent let me be,
  183.  
  184. Make me more daring than devout;
  185. From slock contentment keep inc free
  186.  
  187. And fill me with a buoyant doubt.
  188.  
  189. Open my eyes to visions girt
  190. With beauty, and with wonder lit,
  191.  
  192.  
  193.  
  194. QUOTABLE POEMS
  195.  
  196.  
  197.  
  198. But let me always see the dirt,
  199. And all that spawn and die in it.
  200.  
  201. Open my ears to music, let
  202.  
  203. Me thrill with Spring's first flutes and drums
  204. But never let me dare forget
  205.  
  206. The bitter ballads of the slums.
  207.  
  208. From compromise and things half-done,
  209. Keep me, with stern and stubborn pride;
  210.  
  211. But when at last the fight is won,
  212. God, keep me still unsatisfied.
  213.  
  214. Louis Untermeyer
  215.  
  216.  
  217.  
  218. For Those Who Fail
  219.  
  220. " All honor to him who shall win the prize/'
  221. The world has cried for a thousand years;
  222.  
  223. But to him who tries and who fails and dies,
  224. I give great honor and glory and tears.
  225.  
  226. great is the hero who wins a name,
  227.  
  228. But greater many and many a time
  229. Some pale-faced fellow who dies in shame,
  230.  
  231. And lets God finish the thought sublime.
  232.  
  233. And great is the man with a sword undrawn,
  234. And good is the man who refrains from wine;
  235.  
  236. But the man who fails and yet fights on,
  237. Lo, he is the twin-born brother of mine!
  238.  
  239. Joaquin Miller
  240.  
  241.  
  242.  
  243. QUOTABLE POEMS
  244.  
  245.  
  246.  
  247. In Flanders Fields
  248.  
  249. In Flanders fields the poppies blow
  250. Between the crosses, row on row,
  251. That mark our place; and in the sky
  252. The larks, still bravely singing, fly
  253. Scarce heard amid the guns below.
  254.  
  255. We are the Dead/ Short days ago
  256. We lived, felt dawn, saw sunset glow,
  257. Loved and were loved, and now we lie
  258. In Flanders fields.
  259.  
  260. Take up our quarrel with the foe;
  261. To you from failing hands we throw
  262. The torch; be yours to hold it high.
  263. If ye break faith with us who die
  264. We shall not sleep, though poppies grow
  265. In Flanders fields.
  266.  
  267. John McCrac
  268.  
  269.  
  270.  
  271. Sealed Orders
  272.  
  273. We bear sealed orders o'er Life's weltered sea,
  274.  
  275. Our haven dim and far;
  276. We can but man the helm rigKt cheerily,
  277.  
  278. Steer by the brightest star,
  279.  
  280. And hope that when at last the Great Command
  281.  
  282. Is read, we then may hear
  283. Our anchor song, and see the longed-for land
  284.  
  285. Lie, known and very near.
  286.  
  287. Richard Burton
  288.  
  289.  
  290.  
  291. QUOTABLE POEMS
  292.  
  293.  
  294.  
  295. From Song of the Open Road
  296.  
  297. Afoot and lighthearted I take to the open road,
  298. Healthy, free, the world before me,
  299.  
  300. The long brown path before me leading me wherever I
  301. choose.
  302.  
  303.  
  304.  
  305. Henceforth I ask not good fortune, I myself am good for-
  306. tune,
  307.  
  308. Henceforth I whimper no more, postpone no more, need
  309. nothing;
  310.  
  311. Done with indoor complaints, libraries, querulous criticisms,
  312.  
  313. Strong and content I travel the open road.
  314.  
  315. Walt Whitman
  316.  
  317.  
  318.  
  319. Joses, the Brother of Jesus
  320.  
  321. Joses, the brother of Jesus, plodded from day to day
  322. With never a vision within him to glorify his clay;
  323. Joses, the brother of Jesus, was one with the heavy clod,
  324. But Christ was. the soul of rapture, and soared, like a lark,
  325.  
  326. with God.
  327.  
  328. Joses, the brother of Jesus, was only a worker in wood,
  329. And he never could see the glory that Jesus, his brother,
  330.  
  331. could.
  332. " Why stays he not in the workshop? " he often used to
  333.  
  334. complain,
  335.  
  336. " Sawing the Lebanon cedar, imparting to woods their stain?
  337. Why must he go thus roaming, forsaking my father's
  338.  
  339. trade,
  340. While hammers are busily sounding, and there is gain to be
  341.  
  342. made? "
  343.  
  344.  
  345.  
  346. QUOTABLE POEMS
  347.  
  348.  
  349.  
  350. Thus ran the mind of Joses, apt with plummet and rule,
  351. And deeming whoever surpassed him either a knave or a
  352.  
  353. fool
  354. For he never walked with the prophets in God's great garden
  355.  
  356. of bliss
  357. And of all mistakes of the ages, the saddest, methinks, was
  358.  
  359. this
  360. To have such a brother as Jesus, to speak with him day by
  361.  
  362. day,
  363. But never to catch the vision which glorified his clay.
  364.  
  365. Harry Kemp
  366.  
  367.  
  368.  
  369. The Judgment
  370.  
  371. When before the cloud-white throne
  372. We are kneeling to be known
  373. In self's utter nakedness,
  374. Mercy shall be arbitress.
  375.  
  376. Love shall quench the very shame
  377. That is our tormenting flame;
  378. Love, the one theology,
  379. Set the souls in prison free
  380.  
  381. Free as sunbeams forth to fare
  382. Into outer darkness, where
  383. It shall be our doom to make
  384. Glory from each earth-mistake.
  385.  
  386. Not archangels God elects
  387. For celestial architects;
  388. On the stones of hell, the guilt
  389. Of the world, is Zion built.
  390.  
  391. Katharine Lee Bates
  392.  
  393.  
  394.  
  395. QUOTABLE POEMS
  396.  
  397.  
  398.  
  399. Mountain Air
  400.  
  401. Tell me of Progress if you will,
  402. But give me sunshine on a hill
  403. The grey rocks spiring to the blue,
  404. The scent of larches, pinks and dew,
  405. And summer sighing in the trees,
  406. And snowy breath on every breeze.
  407. Take towns and all that you find there,
  408. And leave me sun and mountain air!
  409.  
  410. John Galsworthy
  411.  
  412.  
  413.  
  414. From Tintern Abbey
  415.  
  416. For I have learned
  417.  
  418. To look on Nature, not as in the hour
  419. Of thoughtless youth; but hearing oftentimes
  420. The still, sad music of humanity,
  421. Nor harsh nor grating, though of ample power
  422. To chasten and subdue. And I have felt
  423. A presence that disturbs rne with the joy
  424. Of elevated thoughts; a sense sublime,
  425. Of something far more deeply interfused,
  426. Whose dwelling is the light of setting suns,
  427. And the round ocean and the living air,
  428. And the blue sky, and in the mind of man;
  429. A motion and a spirit, that impels
  430. All thinking things, all objects of all thought,
  431. And rolls through all things. Therefore am I still
  432. A lover of the meadows and the woods,
  433. And mountains; and of all that we behold
  434. From this green earth; of all the mighty world
  435. Of eye and ear both what they half create,
  436.  
  437.  
  438.  
  439. QUOTABLE POEMS
  440.  
  441.  
  442.  
  443. And what perceive; well pleased to recognize
  444. In nature and the language of the sense,
  445. The anchor of my purest thoughts, the nurse,
  446. The guide, the guardian of my heart, and soul
  447. Of all my moral being.
  448.  
  449. William Wordsworth
  450.  
  451.  
  452.  
  453. The Ideal City
  454.  
  455. O you whom God hath called and set apart
  456.  
  457. To build a city after His own heart,
  458.  
  459. Be this your task to fitll the city's veins
  460.  
  461. With the red blood of friendship; plant her plains
  462.  
  463. With seeds of peace: above her portals wreathe
  464.  
  465. Greeting and welcome: let the air we breathe
  466.  
  467. Be musical with accents of good will
  468.  
  469. That leap from lip to lip with joyous thrill;
  470.  
  471. So may the stranger find upon the streets
  472.  
  473. A kindly look in every face he meets;
  474.  
  475. So may the spirit of the city tell
  476.  
  477. All her souls within her gates that all is well;
  478.  
  479. In all her homes let gentleness be found,
  480.  
  481. In every neighborhood let grace abound,
  482.  
  483. In every store and shop and forge and mill
  484.  
  485. Where men of toil their daily tasks fulfill,
  486.  
  487. Where guiding brain and workmen's skill are wise
  488.  
  489. To shape the product of our industries,
  490.  
  491. Where treasured stores the hands of toil sustain,
  492.  
  493. Let friendship speed the work and share the gain,
  494.  
  495. And thus, through all the city's teeming life,
  496.  
  497. Let helpfulness have room with generous strife
  498.  
  499. To serve.
  500.  
  501. Washington Gladden
  502.  
  503.  
  504.  
  505. QUOTABLE POEMS
  506.  
  507.  
  508.  
  509. Calvary
  510.  
  511. I walked alone to my Calvary,
  512.  
  513. And no man carried the cross for me:
  514.  
  515. Carried the cross? Nay, no man knew
  516.  
  517. The fearful load I bent unto;
  518.  
  519. But each as we met upon the way
  520.  
  521. Spake me fair of the journey I walked that day.
  522.  
  523. I came alone to my Calvary,
  524.  
  525. And high was the hill and bleak to see;
  526.  
  527. But lo, as I scaled the flinty side,
  528.  
  529. A thousand went up to be crucified
  530.  
  531. A thousand kept the way with me,
  532.  
  533. But never a cross my eyes could see.
  534.  
  535. Author Unknown
  536.  
  537. Good Deeds
  538.  
  539. How far that little candle throws his beams!
  540. So shines a good deed in a naughty world.
  541. Heaven doth with us as we with torches do;
  542. Not light them for themselves; for if our virtues
  543. Did not go forth of us, 'twere all alike
  544. As if we had them not.
  545.  
  546. William Shakespeare
  547.  
  548. Abraham Lincoln Walks at Midnight
  549.  
  550. (In Springfield, Illinois)
  551. It is portentous, and a thing of state
  552. That here at midnight, in our little town
  553. A mourning figure walks, and will not rest,
  554. Near the old court-house pacing up and down,
  555.  
  556. From " Collected Poems " by Vachel Lindsay. By permission of
  557. The Macmillan Company, publishers.
  558.  
  559.  
  560.  
  561. 10 QUOTABLE POEMS
  562.  
  563. Or by his homestead, or in shadowed yards
  564. He lingers where his children used to play,
  565. Or through the market, on the well-worn stones
  566. He stalks until the dawn-stars burn away.
  567.  
  568. A bronzed, lank man! His suit of ancient black,
  569. A famous high top-hat and plain worn shawl
  570. Make him the quaint great figure that men love,
  571. The prairie-lawyer, master of us all.
  572.  
  573. He cannot sleep upon his hillside now.
  574.  
  575. He is among us: as in times before!
  576.  
  577. And we who toss and lie awake for long
  578.  
  579. Breathe deep, and start, to see him pass the door,
  580.  
  581. His head is bowed. He thinks on men and kings.
  582. Yea, when the sick world cries, how can he sleep?
  583. Too many peasants fight, they know not why,
  584. Too many homesteads in black terror weep*
  585.  
  586. The sins of all the war-lords burn his heart.
  587. He sees the dreadnoughts scouring every main.
  588. He carries on his shawl-wrapped shoulders now
  589. The bitterness, the folly and the pain.
  590.  
  591. He cannot rest until a spirit-dawn
  592. Shall come; the shining hope of Europe free:
  593. The league of sober folk, the Workers 7 Earth,
  594. Bringing long peace to Cornland, Alp and Sea,
  595.  
  596. It breaks his heart that kings must murder still
  597. That all his hours of travail here for men
  598. Seem yet in vain. And who will bring white peace
  599. That he may sleep upon his hill again?
  600.  
  601. Vachet Undsay
  602.  
  603.  
  604.  
  605. QUOTABLE POEMS 11
  606.  
  607.  
  608.  
  609. Where Is God?
  610.  
  611. " Oh, where is the sea? " the fishes cried,
  612. As they swam the crystal clearness through;
  613.  
  614. " We've heard from of old of the ocean's tide,
  615. And we long to look on the water's blue.
  616.  
  617. The wise ones speak of the infinite sea.
  618. Oh, who can tell us if such there be? "
  619.  
  620. The lark flew up in the morning bright,
  621. And sang and balanced on sunny wings;
  622.  
  623. And this was its song: " I see the light,
  624. I look o'er a world of beautiful things;
  625.  
  626. But, flying and singing everywhere,
  627. In vain I have searched to find the air."
  628.  
  629. Minot /. Savage
  630.  
  631. Deathless
  632.  
  633. I know I am deathless;
  634.  
  635. I know this orbit of mine cannot be swept by the carpenter's
  636.  
  637. compass;
  638.  
  639. I know I shall not pass like a child's carlaque cut with a
  640. burnt stick at night.
  641.  
  642. Walt Whitman
  643. From " Leaves of Grass "
  644.  
  645.  
  646.  
  647. We Are the Music-Makers
  648.  
  649. We are the music-makers,
  650.  
  651. And we are the dreamers of dreams,
  652. Wandering by lone sea-breakers,
  653.  
  654. And sitting by desolate streams
  655.  
  656.  
  657.  
  658. 12 QUOTABLE POEMS
  659.  
  660. World-losers and world-forsakers,
  661.  
  662. On whom the pale moon gleams;
  663. Yet we are the movers and shakers
  664.  
  665. Of the world forever, it seems.
  666.  
  667. With wonderful deathless ditties
  668.  
  669. We build up the world's great cities,
  670. And out of a fabulous story
  671.  
  672. We fashion an empire's glory:
  673. One man with a dream, at pleasure,
  674.  
  675. Shall go forth and conquer a crown;
  676. And three with a new song's measure
  677.  
  678. Can trample a kingdom down.
  679.  
  680. We, in the ages lying
  681.  
  682. In the buried past of the earth,
  683. Built Nineveh with our sighing,
  684.  
  685. And Babel itself in our mirth;
  686. And o'er threw them with prophesying
  687.  
  688. To the old of the new world's worth;
  689. For each age is a dream that is dying,
  690.  
  691. Or one that is coming to birth.
  692.  
  693. Arthur O'Shaughnessy
  694.  
  695. In the Woods
  696.  
  697. Oh, when I am safe in my sylvan home
  698. I tread on the pride of Greece and Rome*
  699. But when I am stretched beneath the pines,
  700. When the evening star so lonely shines,
  701. I laugh at the love and the pride of man,
  702. At the sophist's schools and the learned clan;
  703. For what are they all in their high conceit
  704. When man in the bush with God can meet?
  705.  
  706. Ralph Waldo Emerson
  707. From " Good-bye, Proud World "
  708.  
  709.  
  710.  
  711. QUOTABLE POEMS 13
  712.  
  713.  
  714.  
  715. " In No Strange Land "
  716.  
  717. WORLD invisible, we view thee,
  718. world intangible, we touch thee,
  719. world unknowable, we know thee,
  720. Inapprehensible, we clutch thee!
  721.  
  722.  
  723.  
  724. Does the fish soar to find the ocean,
  725. The eagle plunge to find the air
  726. That we ask of the stars in motion
  727. If they have rumor of thee there?
  728.  
  729. !Not where the wheeling systems darken,
  730. And our benumbed conceiving soars 1
  731. The drift of pinions, would we hearken,
  732. Beats at our own clay-shuttered doors.
  733.  
  734. The angels keep their ancient places;
  735. Turn but a stone, and start a wing!
  736. ? Tis ye, 'tis your estranged faces,
  737. That miss the many-splendored thing.
  738.  
  739. But (when so sad thou canst not sadder)
  740. Cry; and upon thy so sore loss
  741. Shall shine the traffic of Jacob's ladder
  742. Pitched betwixt Heaven and Charing Cross.
  743.  
  744. Yea, in the night, my Soul, my daughter,
  745. Cry, clinging Heaven by the hems;
  746. And lo, Christ walking on the water
  747. Not of Genesareth, but Thames!
  748.  
  749. Francis Thompson
  750.  
  751.  
  752.  
  753. 14 QUOTABLE POEMS
  754.  
  755.  
  756.  
  757. lo Victis
  758.  
  759. I sing the hymn of the conquered, who fall in the Battle of
  760. Life
  761.  
  762. The hymn of the wounded, the beaten, who died overwhelmed
  763. in the strife ;
  764.  
  765. Not the jubilant song of the victors, for whom the resound-
  766. ing acclaim
  767.  
  768. Of nations was lifted in chorus, whose brows wear the chaplet
  769. of fame,
  770.  
  771. But the hymn of the low and the humble, the weary, the
  772. broken in heart,
  773.  
  774. Who strove and who failed, acting bravely a silent and des-
  775. perate part;
  776.  
  777. Whose youth bore no flower in its branches, whose hopes
  778. burned in ashes away,
  779.  
  780. From whose hands slipped the prize they had grasped at,
  781. who stood at the dying of day
  782.  
  783. With the wreck of their life all around them, unpitied, un-
  784. heeded, alone,
  785.  
  786. With Death swooping down o'er their failure, and all but
  787. their faith overthrown,
  788.  
  789. While the voice of the world shouts its chorus its paean for
  790. those who have won;
  791.  
  792. While the trumpet is sounding triumphant, and high to the
  793. breeze and the sun
  794.  
  795. Glad banners are waving, hands clapping, and hurrying feet
  796.  
  797. Thronging after the laurel crowned victors, T stand on the
  798. field of defeat,
  799.  
  800. In the shadow, with those who are fallen, and wounded, and
  801. dying, and there
  802.  
  803. Chant a requiem low, place my hand on their pain-knotted
  804. brows, breathe a prayer,
  805.  
  806. Hold the hand that is helpless, and whisper, " They only the
  807. victory win,
  808.  
  809.  
  810.  
  811. QUOTABLE POEMS IS
  812.  
  813. Who have fought the good fight, and have vanquished the
  814.  
  815. demon that tempts us within;
  816. Who have held to their faith unseduced by the prize that the
  817.  
  818. world holds on high;
  819. Who have dared for a high cause to suffer, resist, fight if
  820.  
  821. need be, to die."
  822. Speak, History! Who are Life's victors? Unroll thy long
  823.  
  824. annals and say,
  825. Are they those whom the world called the victors, who won
  826.  
  827. the success of a day?
  828.  
  829. The martyrs, or Nero? The Spartans, who fell at Ther-
  830. mopylae's tryst,
  831. Or the Persians and Xerxes? His judges or Socrates, Pilate
  832.  
  833. or Christ?
  834.  
  835. William Wetmore Story
  836.  
  837.  
  838.  
  839. The Kings Are Passing Deathward
  840.  
  841. The kings are passing deathward in the dark
  842.  
  843. Of days that had been splendid where they went;
  844. Their crowns are captive and their courts are stark
  845.  
  846. Of purples that are ruinous, now, and rent.
  847. For all that they have seen disastrous things:
  848.  
  849. The shattered pomp, the split and shaken throne,
  850. fhey cannot quite forget the way of Kings:
  851.  
  852. Gravely they pass, majestic and alone.
  853.  
  854. With thunder on their brows, their faces set
  855. Toward the eternal night of restless shapes,
  856.  
  857. They walk in awful splendor, regal yet,
  858. Wearing their crimes like rich and kingly capes . . .
  859.  
  860. Curse them or taunt, they will not hear or see;
  861.  
  862. The Kings are passing deathward: let them be.
  863.  
  864. David Morton
  865.  
  866.  
  867.  
  868. 16 QUOTABLE POEMS
  869.  
  870.  
  871.  
  872. Failures
  873.  
  874. They bear no laurels on their sunless brows,
  875. Nor aught within their pale hands as they go;
  876. They look as men accustomed to the slow
  877. And level onward course 'neath drooping boughs.
  878. Who may these be no trumpet doth arouse,
  879. These of the dark processionals of woe,
  880. Unpraised, unblamed, but whom sad Acheron's flow
  881. Monotonously lulls to leaden drowse?
  882. These are the Failures. Clutched by Circumstance,
  883. They were say not, too weak! too ready prey
  884. To their own fear whose fixed Gorgon glance
  885. Made them as stone for aught of great essay;
  886. Or else they nodded when their Master-Chance
  887. Wound his one signal, and went on his way,
  888.  
  889. Arthur W. Upson
  890.  
  891.  
  892.  
  893. Life Owes Me Nothing
  894.  
  895. Life owes me nothing. Let the years
  896. Bring clouds or azure, joy or tears,
  897.  
  898. Already a full cup I've quaffed;
  899.  
  900. Already wept and loved and laughed,
  901. And seen, in ever endless ways,
  902. New beauties overwhelm the days.
  903.  
  904. Life owes me naught. No pain that waits
  905. Can steal the wealth from memory's gates;
  906. No aftermath of anguish slow
  907. Can quench the soul-fire's early glow,
  908. I breathe, exulting, each new breath,
  909. Embracing Life, ignoring Death.
  910.  
  911.  
  912.  
  913. QUOTABLE POEMS 17
  914.  
  915. Life owes me nothing. One clear morn
  916. Is boon enough for being born;
  917.  
  918. ' And be it ninety years or ten,
  919.  
  920. No need for me to question when.
  921. While Life is mine, I'll find it good,
  922. And greet each hour with gratitude.
  923.  
  924. Author Unknown
  925.  
  926.  
  927.  
  928. If This Were Enough
  929.  
  930. God, if this were enough,
  931.  
  932. That I see things bare to the buff
  933.  
  934. And up to the buttocks in mire;
  935.  
  936. That I ask not hope nor hire,
  937.  
  938. Not in the husk,
  939.  
  940. Nor dawn beyond the dusk,
  941.  
  942. Nor life beyond death:
  943.  
  944. God, if this were faith?
  945.  
  946. Having felt Thy wind in my face
  947.  
  948. Spit sorrow and disgrace,
  949.  
  950. Having seen Thine evil doom
  951.  
  952. In Golgotha and Khartoum,
  953.  
  954. And the brutes, the work of Thine hands,
  955.  
  956. Fill with injustice lands
  957.  
  958. And stain with blood the sea:
  959.  
  960. If still in my veins the glee
  961.  
  962. Of the black night and the sun
  963.  
  964. And the lost battle, run:
  965.  
  966. If, an adept,
  967.  
  968. The iniquitous lists I still accept
  969.  
  970. With joy, and joy to endure and be withstood,
  971.  
  972. And still to battle and perish for a dream of good:
  973.  
  974. God, if that were enough?
  975.  
  976.  
  977.  
  978. 18 QUOTABLE POEMS
  979.  
  980. If to feel, in the ink of the slough,
  981.  
  982. And the sink of the mire,
  983.  
  984. Veins of glory and fire
  985.  
  986. Run through and transpierce and transpire,
  987.  
  988. And a secret purpose of glory in every part,
  989.  
  990. And the answering glory of battle fill my heart;
  991.  
  992. To thrill with the joy of girded men
  993.  
  994. To go on forever and fail and go on again,
  995.  
  996. And be mauled to the earth and arise,
  997.  
  998. And contend for the shade of a word and a thing not seen
  999.  
  1000. with the eyes;
  1001.  
  1002. With the half of a broken hope for a pillow at night
  1003. That somehow the right is the right
  1004. And the smooth shall bloom from the rough:
  1005. Lord, if that were enough?
  1006.  
  1007. Robert Louts Stevenson
  1008.  
  1009.  
  1010.  
  1011. A Morning Prayer
  1012.  
  1013. Let me today do something that will take
  1014. A little sadness from the world's vast store,
  1015.  
  1016. And may I be so favored as to make
  1017. Of joy's too scanty sum a little more.
  1018.  
  1019. Let me not hurt, by any selfish deed
  1020.  
  1021. Or thoughtless word, the heart of foe or friend.
  1022. Nor would I pass unseeing worthy need,
  1023.  
  1024. Or sin by silence when I should defend.
  1025.  
  1026. However meager be my worldly wealth,
  1027. Let me give something that shall aid my kind
  1028.  
  1029. A word of courage, or a thought of health
  1030. Dropped as I pass for troubled hearts to find.
  1031.  
  1032.  
  1033.  
  1034. QUOTABLE POEMS 19
  1035.  
  1036. Let me tonight look back across the span
  1037.  
  1038. Twixt dawn and dark, and to my conscience say
  1039.  
  1040. Because of some good act to beast or man
  1041. " The world is better that I lived today."
  1042.  
  1043. Ella Wheeler Wilcox
  1044.  
  1045. From Thanatopsis
  1046.  
  1047. So live that when thy summons comes to join
  1048. The innumerable caravan that moves
  1049. To that mysterious realm, where each shall take
  1050. His chamber in the silent halls of death,
  1051. Thou go not, like the quarry-slave at night,
  1052. Scourged to his dungeon, but, sustained and soothed
  1053. By an unfaltering trust, approach thy grave
  1054. Like one who wraps the drapery of his couch
  1055. About him, and lies down to pleasant dreams.
  1056.  
  1057. William Cullen Bryant
  1058.  
  1059. Count That Day Lost
  1060.  
  1061. If you sit down at set of sun
  1062.  
  1063. And count the acts that you have done,
  1064.  
  1065. And, counting find
  1066. One self-denying deed, one word
  1067. That eased the heart of him who heard;
  1068.  
  1069. One glance most kind,
  1070. That fell like sunshine where it went
  1071. Then you may count that day well spent.
  1072.  
  1073. But if, through all the livelong day,
  1074. YouVe cheered no heart, by yea or nay
  1075.  
  1076. If, through it all
  1077. YouVe nothing done that you can trace
  1078.  
  1079.  
  1080.  
  1081. 20 QUOTABLE POEMS
  1082.  
  1083. That brought the sunshine to one face
  1084.  
  1085. No act most small
  1086.  
  1087. That helped some soul and nothing cost
  1088. Then count that day as worse than lost.
  1089.  
  1090. George Eliot
  1091.  
  1092. The Question Whither
  1093.  
  1094. When we have thrown off this old suit
  1095.  
  1096. So much in need of mending,
  1097. To sink among the naked mute,
  1098.  
  1099. Is that, think you, our ending?
  1100. We follow many, more we lead,
  1101.  
  1102. And you who sadly turf us,
  1103. Believe not that all living seed
  1104.  
  1105. Must flower above the surface.
  1106.  
  1107. Sensation is a gracious gift
  1108.  
  1109. But were it cramped to station,
  1110. The prayer to have it cast adrift
  1111.  
  1112. Would spout from all sensation.
  1113. Enough if we have winked to sun,
  1114.  
  1115. Have sped the plough a season,
  1116. There is a soul for labor done,
  1117.  
  1118. Endureth fixed as reason.
  1119.  
  1120. Then let our trust be firm in Good,
  1121.  
  1122. Though we be of the fasting;
  1123. Our questions arc a mortal brood,
  1124.  
  1125. Our work is everlasting.
  1126. We Children of Beneficence
  1127.  
  1128. Are in its being sharers;
  1129. And Whither vainer sounds than Whence
  1130.  
  1131. For word with such wayfarers,
  1132.  
  1133. George Meredith
  1134.  
  1135.  
  1136.  
  1137. QUOTABLE POEMS 21
  1138.  
  1139.  
  1140.  
  1141. To Whom Shall the World Henceforth Belong?
  1142.  
  1143. To whom shall the world henceforth belong,
  1144. And who shall go up and possess it?
  1145.  
  1146. To the Great-Hearts the Strong
  1147.  
  1148. Who will suffer no wrong,
  1149.  
  1150. And where they find evil redress it.
  1151.  
  1152. To the men of Bold Light
  1153.  
  1154. Whose souls seized of Right,
  1155.  
  1156. Found a work to be done and have done it.
  1157.  
  1158. To the Valiant who fought
  1159. For a soul-lifting thought,
  1160. Saw the fight to be won and have won it.
  1161.  
  1162. To the Men of Great Mind
  1163.  
  1164. Set on lifting their kind,
  1165.  
  1166. Who, regardless of danger, will do it.
  1167.  
  1168. To the Men of Good-will,
  1169.  
  1170. Who would cure all Life's ill,
  1171.  
  1172. And whose passion for peace will ensue it.
  1173.  
  1174. To the Men who will bear
  1175.  
  1176. Their full share of Life's care,
  1177.  
  1178. And will rest not till wrongs be all righted.
  1179.  
  1180. To the Stalwarts who toil
  1181. 'Mid the seas of turmoil,
  1182. Till the haven of safety be sighted.
  1183.  
  1184. To the Men of Good Fame
  1185.  
  1186. Who everything claim
  1187.  
  1188. This world and the next in their Master's great name
  1189.  
  1190.  
  1191.  
  1192. 22 QUOTABLE POEMS
  1193.  
  1194. To these shall the world henceforth belong,
  1195. And they shall go up and possess it;
  1196. Overmuch, o'erlong, has the world suffered wrong,
  1197. We are here by God's help to redress it.
  1198.  
  1199. John Oxenham
  1200.  
  1201. Man
  1202.  
  1203. What a piece of work is a man I how noble in reason! how
  1204. infinite in faculty! in form and moving how express and
  1205. admirable! in action how like an angel! in apprehension
  1206. how like a god! the beauty of the world! the paragon of
  1207. animals!
  1208.  
  1209. William Shakespeare
  1210. From " Hamlet, Prince of Denmark "
  1211.  
  1212.  
  1213.  
  1214. Bring Me Men
  1215.  
  1216. Bring me men to match my mountains,
  1217.  
  1218. Bring me men to match my plains
  1219. Men with empires in their purpose
  1220.  
  1221. And new eras in their brains.
  1222. Bring me men to match my prairies,
  1223.  
  1224. Men to match my inland seas,
  1225. Men whose thought shall prove a highway
  1226.  
  1227. Up to ampler destinies,
  1228. Pioneers to clear thought's marshlands
  1229.  
  1230. And to cleanse old error's pen;
  1231. Bring me men to match my mountains
  1232.  
  1233. Bring me men!
  1234.  
  1235. Bring me men to m^tch my forests,
  1236. Strong to fight the storm and blast,
  1237.  
  1238. Branching toward the skyey future,
  1239. Rooted in the fertile past.
  1240.  
  1241.  
  1242.  
  1243. QUOTABLE POEMS 23
  1244.  
  1245. Bring me men to match my valleys,
  1246.  
  1247. Tolerant of sun and snow,
  1248. Men within whose fruitful purpose
  1249.  
  1250. Time's consummate blooms shall grow,
  1251. Men to tame the tigerish instincts
  1252.  
  1253. Of the lair and cave and den,
  1254. Cleanse the dragon slime of nature
  1255.  
  1256. Bring me men!
  1257.  
  1258. Bring me men to match my rivers,
  1259.  
  1260. Continent cleavers, flowing free,
  1261. Drawn by the eternal madness
  1262.  
  1263. To be mingled with the sea;
  1264. Men of oceanic impulse,
  1265.  
  1266. Men whose moral currents sweep
  1267. Towards the wide-infolding ocean
  1268.  
  1269. Of an undiscovered deep;
  1270. Men who feel the strong pulsation
  1271.  
  1272. Of tr^e central sea and then
  1273. Time their currents to its earth throb
  1274.  
  1275. Bring me men!
  1276.  
  1277. Sam Walter Foss
  1278. From " The Coming American "
  1279.  
  1280. Joy and Sorrow
  1281.  
  1282. Sullen skies today,
  1283.  
  1284. Sunny skies tomorrow;
  1285. November steals from May,
  1286.  
  1287. And May from her doth borrow;
  1288. Griefs Joys in Time's strange dance
  1289. Interchangeably advance;
  1290. The sweetest joys that come to us
  1291.  
  1292. Come sweeter for past sorrow,
  1293.  
  1294. Aubrey De Vere
  1295.  
  1296.  
  1297.  
  1298. 24 QUOTABLE POEMS
  1299.  
  1300.  
  1301.  
  1302. Thy Kingdom Come!
  1303.  
  1304. Across the bitter centuries I hear the wail of men:
  1305.  
  1306. " Oh, would that Jesus Lord, the Christ, would come to us
  1307.  
  1308. again."
  1309.  
  1310. We decorate our altars with ceremonious pride,
  1311. With all the outward shows of pomp His worship is
  1312.  
  1313. supplied,
  1314.  
  1315. Great churches raise their mighty spires to pierce the sun-
  1316. lit skies,
  1317. While in the shadow of the cross we utter blasphemies.
  1318.  
  1319. We know we do not do His will who lessoned us to pray,
  1320. " Our Father grant within our lives Thy Kingdom rule
  1321.  
  1322. today."
  1323.  
  1324. The prayer He taught us, once a week we mouth with half-
  1325. shut eye,
  1326. While in the charnel-house of words immortal meanings
  1327.  
  1328. die.
  1329.  
  1330. Above our brothers' frailties we cry " Unclean! Unclean! "
  1331. And with the hands that served her shame still stone the
  1332. Magdalene.
  1333.  
  1334. We know within our factories that wan-cheeked women
  1335.  
  1336. reel
  1337. Among the deft and droning belts that spin from wheel to
  1338.  
  1339. wheel.
  1340. We know that unsexed childhood droops in dull-eyed
  1341.  
  1342. drudgery
  1343.  
  1344. The little children that He blessed in far-off Galilee
  1345. Yet surely, Lord, our hearts would grow more merciful to
  1346.  
  1347. them,
  1348. If Thou couldst come again to us as once in Bethlehem.
  1349.  
  1350. Willard Wattles
  1351.  
  1352.  
  1353.  
  1354. QUOTABLE POEMS 25
  1355.  
  1356.  
  1357.  
  1358. The Face of a Friend
  1359.  
  1360. Blessed is the man that beholdeth the face of a friend in a
  1361.  
  1362. far country,
  1363. The darkness of his heart is melted in the dawning of day
  1364.  
  1365. within him,
  1366. It is like the sound of sweet music heard long ago and half
  1367.  
  1368. forgotten;
  1369. It is like the coming back of birds to a wood where the
  1370.  
  1371. winter is ended.
  1372.  
  1373. Henry van Dyke
  1374.  
  1375.  
  1376.  
  1377. Consummation
  1378.  
  1379. Not poppies plant not poppies on my grave!
  1380.  
  1381. I want no anodyne to make me sleep ;
  1382. I want that All-Bestowing Power, who gave
  1383. Immortal love to life, and which we crave
  1384.  
  1385. The promise of a larger life, to keep.
  1386.  
  1387. What that may be I know not no one knows;
  1388.  
  1389. But since love's graces I have striven to gain,
  1390. Plant o'er my soon-forgotten dust, a rose
  1391. That flower which in love's garden ever blows
  1392.  
  1393. That thus a fragrant memory may remain.
  1394.  
  1395. For my fond hope has been, that I might leave
  1396.  
  1397. A Flowering even in the wayside grass
  1398. A Touch of Bloom, life's grayness to relieve
  1399. A Beauty, they who follow may perceive,
  1400. That hints the scent of roses as they pass.
  1401.  
  1402. James Terry White
  1403.  
  1404.  
  1405.  
  1406. 26 QUOTABLE POEMS
  1407.  
  1408.  
  1409.  
  1410. To My Countrymen
  1411. (A Voice for Peace)
  1412.  
  1413. Heirs of great yesterdays, be proud with me
  1414. Of your most envied treasure of the Past;
  1415. Not wide domain; not doubtful wealth amassed;
  1416. Not ganglia cities rival worlds to be:
  1417. But great souls, servitors of Liberty,
  1418. Who kept the state to star-set Honor fast,
  1419. Not for ourselves alone but that, at last,
  1420. No nation should to Baal bow the knee.
  1421.  
  1422. Are we content to be inheritors?
  1423. Can you not hear the pleading of the sod
  1424. That canopies our heroes? Hasten, then!
  1425. Help the sad earth unlearn the vogue of war.
  1426. Be just and earn the eternal praise of men;
  1427. Be generous and win the smile of God.
  1428.  
  1429. Robert Underwood Johnson
  1430.  
  1431. Sunrise
  1432. Day!
  1433.  
  1434. Faster and more fast,
  1435. O'er night's brim, day boils at last:
  1436. Boils, pure gold, o'er the cloud-cap's brim
  1437. Where spurting and suppressed it lay,
  1438. For not a froth-flake touched the rim
  1439. Of yonder gap in the solid gray
  1440. Of the eastern cloud, an hour away;
  1441. But forth one wavelet, then another, curled,
  1442. Till the whole sunrise, not to be suppressed,
  1443. Rose, reddened, and its seething breast
  1444. Flickered in bounds, grew gold, then overflowed the world.
  1445.  
  1446. Robert Browning
  1447.  
  1448.  
  1449.  
  1450. QUOTABLE POEMS 27
  1451.  
  1452.  
  1453.  
  1454. From Elegy Written in a Country Churchyard
  1455.  
  1456. The curfew tolls the knell of parting day,
  1457. The lowing herd winds slowly o'er the lea,
  1458.  
  1459. The ploughman homeward plods his weary way,
  1460. And leaves the world to darkness and to me.
  1461.  
  1462. Now fades the glimmering landscape on the sight,
  1463. And all the air a solemn stillness holds,
  1464.  
  1465. Save where the beetle wheels his droning flight,
  1466. And drowsy tinklings lull the distant folds;
  1467.  
  1468. Save that, from yonder ivy-mantled tower,
  1469. The moping owl does to the moon complain
  1470.  
  1471. Of such as, wandering near her secret bower,
  1472. Molest her ancient, solitary reign.
  1473.  
  1474. Beneath those rugged elms, that yew-tree's shade,
  1475. Where heaves the turf in many a mouldering heap,
  1476.  
  1477. Each in his narrow cell forever laid,
  1478. The rude forefathers of the hamlet sleep.
  1479.  
  1480. The breezy call of incense-breathing morn,
  1481. The swallow twittering from the straw-built shed,
  1482.  
  1483. The cock's shrill clarion, or the echoing horn,
  1484. No more shall rouse them from their lowly bed.
  1485.  
  1486. For them no more the blazing hearth shall burn,
  1487. Or busy housewife ply her evening care;
  1488.  
  1489. No children run to lisp their sire's return,
  1490. Or climb his knees the envied kiss to share.
  1491.  
  1492. Oft did the harvest to their sickle yield,
  1493. Their furrow oft the stubborn glebe has broke;
  1494.  
  1495. How jocund did they drive their team afield!
  1496. How bowed the woods beneath their sturdy strokel
  1497.  
  1498.  
  1499.  
  1500. 28 QUOTABLE POEMS
  1501.  
  1502. Let not ambition mock their useful toil,
  1503. Their homely joys, and destiny obscure;
  1504.  
  1505. Nor grandeur hear with a disdainful smile
  1506. The short and simple annals of the poor.
  1507.  
  1508. The boast of heraldry, the pomp of power,
  1509. And all that beauty, all that wealth e'er gave,
  1510.  
  1511. Await alike the inevitable hour:
  1512.  
  1513. The paths of glory lead but to the grave,
  1514.  
  1515. Nor you, ye proud, impute to these the fault,
  1516. If memory o'er their tomb no trophies raise
  1517.  
  1518. Where through the long-drawn aisle and fretted vault
  1519. The pealing anthem swells the note of praise.
  1520.  
  1521. Can stoned urn or animated bust
  1522. Back to its mansion call the fleeting breath?
  1523.  
  1524. Can Honor's voice provoke the silent dust
  1525. Or Flattery soothe the dull cold ear of Death?
  1526.  
  1527. Perhaps in this neglected spot is laid
  1528. Some heart once pregnant with celestial fire;
  1529.  
  1530. Hands that the rod of empire might have swayed,
  1531. Or wak'd to ecstasy the living lyre;
  1532.  
  1533. But Knowledge to their eyes her ample page,
  1534. Rich with the spoils of time, did ne'er unroll;
  1535.  
  1536. Chill Penury repressed their noble rage,
  1537. And froze the genial current of the soul.
  1538.  
  1539. Full many a gem of purest ray serene
  1540. The dark, unfathomed caves of ocean bear:
  1541.  
  1542. Full many a flower is born to blush unseen,
  1543. And waste its sweetness on the desert air.
  1544.  
  1545. Thomas Gray
  1546.  
  1547.  
  1548.  
  1549. QUOTABLE POEMS 29
  1550.  
  1551.  
  1552.  
  1553. Under the Harvest Moon
  1554.  
  1555. Under the harvest moon,
  1556. When the soft silver
  1557. Drips shimmering
  1558. Over the garden nights,
  1559. Death, the gray mocker
  1560. Comes and whispers to you
  1561. As a beautiful friend
  1562. Who remembers.
  1563. Under the summer roses,
  1564. When the flagrant crimson
  1565. Lurks in the dusk
  1566. Of the wild red leaves,
  1567. Love, with little hands,
  1568. Comes and touches you
  1569. With a thousand memories,
  1570. And asks you
  1571. Beautiful unanswerable questions.
  1572.  
  1573. Carl Sandburg
  1574.  
  1575. The Creedless Love
  1576.  
  1577. A creedless love, that knows no clan,
  1578.  
  1579. No caste, no cult, no church but Man;
  1580. That deems today and now and here,
  1581.  
  1582. Are voice and vision of the seer;
  1583. That through this lifted human clod
  1584.  
  1585. The inflow of the breath of God
  1586. Still sheds its apostolic powers
  1587.  
  1588. Such love, such trust, such faith be ours.
  1589.  
  1590. We deem man climbs an endless slope
  1591.  
  1592. Tow'rd far-seen tablelands of hope;
  1593. That he, through filth and shame of sin,
  1594.  
  1595. Still seeks the God that speaks within;
  1596.  
  1597.  
  1598.  
  1599. 30 QUOTABLE POEMS
  1600.  
  1601. That all the years since time began
  1602.  
  1603. Work the eternal Rise of Man ;
  1604. And all the days that time shall see
  1605.  
  1606. Tend tow'rd the Eden yet to be.
  1607.  
  1608. Too long our music-hungering needs
  1609. Have heard the iron clash of creeds.
  1610.  
  1611. The creedless love that knows no clan,
  1612. No caste, no cult, no church but Man,
  1613.  
  1614. Shall drown with mellow music all,
  1615. The dying jangle of their brawl;
  1616.  
  1617. Such love with all its quickening powers,
  1618. Such love to God and Man be ours.
  1619.  
  1620. Sam Walter Foss
  1621.  
  1622. Love Over All
  1623.  
  1624. Time flies,
  1625.  
  1626. Suns rise
  1627.  
  1628. And shadows fall.
  1629.  
  1630. Let time go by.
  1631.  
  1632. Love is forever over all.
  1633.  
  1634. From an English Sun Dial
  1635.  
  1636.  
  1637.  
  1638. Patience
  1639.  
  1640. Sometimes I wish that I might do
  1641. Just one grand deed and die,
  1642.  
  1643. And by that one grand deed reach up
  1644. To meet God in the sky.
  1645.  
  1646. But such is not Thy way, God,
  1647.  
  1648. Nor such is Thy decree,
  1649. But deed by deed, and tear by tear,
  1650.  
  1651. Our souls must climb to Thee,
  1652.  
  1653.  
  1654.  
  1655. QUOTABLE POEMS 31
  1656.  
  1657. As climbed the only son of God
  1658.  
  1659. From manger unto Cross,
  1660. Who learned, through tears and bloody sweat,
  1661.  
  1662. To count this world but loss;
  1663.  
  1664. Who left the Virgin Mother's arms
  1665.  
  1666. To seek those arms of shame,
  1667. Outstretched upon a lonely hill
  1668.  
  1669. To which the darkness came.
  1670.  
  1671.  
  1672.  
  1673. As deed by deed, and tear by tear,
  1674.  
  1675. He climbed up to the height,
  1676. Each deed a splendid deed, each tear
  1677.  
  1678. A jewel shining bright,
  1679.  
  1680. So grant us, Lord, the patient heart,
  1681.  
  1682. To climb the upward way,
  1683. Until we stand upon the height,
  1684.  
  1685. And see the perfect day.
  1686.  
  1687. G. A. Studdert-Kennedy
  1688.  
  1689. A Leaf of Grass
  1690.  
  1691. I believe a leaf of grass is no less than the journey-work of
  1692.  
  1693. the stars,
  1694. And the pismire is equally perfect, and a grain of sand, and
  1695.  
  1696. the. egg of the wren,
  1697.  
  1698. And the tree-toad is a chef-d'oeuvre for the highest,
  1699. And the running blackberry would adorn the parlors of
  1700.  
  1701. heaven,
  1702. And the narrowest hinge in my hand puts to scorn all
  1703.  
  1704. machinery,
  1705.  
  1706.  
  1707.  
  1708. 32 QUOTABLE POEMS
  1709.  
  1710. And the cow crunching with depressed head surpasses any
  1711.  
  1712. statue,
  1713.  
  1714. And a mouse is miracle enough to stagger sextillions of
  1715. infidels.
  1716.  
  1717. Walt Whitman
  1718. From " Leaves of Grass "
  1719.  
  1720.  
  1721.  
  1722. The Lost Christ
  1723.  
  1724. Your skill has fashioned stately creeds,
  1725. But where is He, we pray
  1726.  
  1727. The friendly Christ of loving deeds?
  1728. He is not here today.
  1729.  
  1730. With sentences that twist and tease,
  1731.  
  1732. Confusing mind and heart,
  1733. You forge your wordy homilies
  1734.  
  1735. And bid us heed your art.
  1736.  
  1737. But where is He or can you tell?
  1738. Who stilled the brothers' strife,
  1739.  
  1740. Who urged the woman at the well
  1741. To live a better life?
  1742.  
  1743. Where is the Saint of Galilee,
  1744. Crude Peter's faithful guide;
  1745.  
  1746. The man who wept at Bethany
  1747. Because His friend had died?
  1748.  
  1749. We weary of your musty lore
  1750.  
  1751. Behind dead walls of gray;
  1752. We want His loving words once more
  1753.  
  1754. By some Emmaus way.
  1755.  
  1756.  
  1757.  
  1758. QUOTABLE POEMS 33
  1759.  
  1760. Give us the Christ who can bestow
  1761.  
  1762. Some comfort-thought of death.
  1763. Give us a Christ our hearts can know
  1764.  
  1765. The Man of Nazareth.
  1766.  
  1767. Thomas Curtis Clark
  1768.  
  1769.  
  1770.  
  1771. Our Known Unknown
  1772.  
  1773. Thou as represented to me here
  1774. In such conception as my soul allows
  1775. Under Thy measureless, my atom-width!
  1776. Man's mind, what is it but a convex-glass
  1777. Wherein are gathered all the scattered points
  1778. Picked out of the immensity of sky,
  1779. To reunite there, be our heaven for earth,
  1780. Our known Unknown, our God revealed to man?
  1781.  
  1782. Robert Browning
  1783. From " The Ring and the Book "
  1784.  
  1785.  
  1786.  
  1787. Today, O Lord
  1788.  
  1789. O Lord, I pray
  1790. That for this day
  1791.  
  1792. I may not swerve
  1793. By foot or hand
  1794. From Thy command
  1795.  
  1796. Not to be served, but to serve.
  1797.  
  1798. This, too, I pray,
  1799. That from this day
  1800.  
  1801. No love of ease
  1802. Nor pride prevent
  1803. My good intent
  1804.  
  1805. Not to be pleased, but to please.
  1806.  
  1807.  
  1808.  
  1809. 34 QUOTABLE POEMS
  1810.  
  1811. And if I may
  1812. I'd have this day
  1813.  
  1814. Strength from above
  1815. To set my heart
  1816. In heavenly art
  1817.  
  1818. Not to be loved, but to love.
  1819.  
  1820. Maltbie D. Babcock
  1821.  
  1822. Where is Heaven?
  1823.  
  1824. Where is Heaven? Is it not
  1825.  
  1826. Just a friendly garden plot,
  1827.  
  1828. Walled with stone and roofed with sun,
  1829.  
  1830. Where the days pass one by one
  1831.  
  1832. Not too fast and not too slow,
  1833.  
  1834. Looking backward as they go
  1835.  
  1836. At the beauties left behind
  1837.  
  1838. To transport the pensive mind.
  1839.  
  1840. Does not Heaven begin that day
  1841. When the eager heart can say,
  1842. Surely God is in this place,
  1843. I have seen Him face to face
  1844. In the loveliness of flowers,
  1845. In the service of the showers,
  1846. And His voice has talked to me
  1847. In the sunlit apple tree.
  1848.  
  1849. Bliss Carman
  1850.  
  1851. A Prayer for the New Year
  1852.  
  1853. O year that is going, take with you
  1854. Some evil that dwells in my heart;
  1855. Let selfishness, doubt,
  1856. With the old year go out
  1857. With joy I would see them depart.
  1858.  
  1859.  
  1860.  
  1861. QUOTABLE POEMS 35
  1862.  
  1863. year that is going, take with you
  1864. Impatience and wilfulness pride;
  1865. The sharp word that slips
  1866.  
  1867. From those too hasty lips,
  1868.  
  1869. 1 would cast, with the old year aside.
  1870.  
  1871.  
  1872.  
  1873. year that is coming, bring with you
  1874.  
  1875. Some virtue of which I have need;
  1876.  
  1877. More patience to bear
  1878.  
  1879. And more kindness to share,
  1880.  
  1881. And more love that is true love indeed.
  1882.  
  1883. Laura F. Armitage
  1884.  
  1885.  
  1886.  
  1887. The Stirrup-Cup
  1888.  
  1889. Death, thou'rt a cordial old and rare:
  1890. Look how compounded, with what care!
  1891. Time got his wrinkles reaping thee
  1892. Sweet herbs from all antiquity.
  1893.  
  1894.  
  1895.  
  1896. David to thy distillage went,
  1897. Keats, and Gotama excellent,
  1898. Omar Khayyam, and Chaucer bright,
  1899. And Shakespeare for a king-delight.
  1900.  
  1901.  
  1902.  
  1903. Then, Time, let not a drop be spilt:
  1904. Hand me the cup whene'er thou wilt;
  1905. 'Tis thy rich stirrup-cup to me;
  1906. I'll drink it down right smilingly.
  1907.  
  1908. Sidney Lanier
  1909.  
  1910.  
  1911.  
  1912. 36 QUOTABLE POEMS
  1913.  
  1914.  
  1915.  
  1916. Mothers of Men
  1917.  
  1918. " I hold no cause worth my son's life," one said
  1919.  
  1920. And the two women with her as she spoke
  1921.  
  1922. Joined glances in a hush that neither broke,
  1923.  
  1924. So present was the memory of their dead.
  1925.  
  1926. And through their meeting eyes their souls drew near,
  1927.  
  1928. Linked by their sons, men who had held life dear
  1929.  
  1930. But laid it down for something dearer still.
  1931.  
  1932. One had wrought out with patient iron will
  1933.  
  1934. The riddle of a pestilence, and won,
  1935.  
  1936. Fighting on stricken, till his work was done
  1937.  
  1938. For children of tomorrow. Far away
  1939.  
  1940. In shell-torn soil of France the other lay,
  1941.  
  1942. And in the letter that his mother read
  1943.  
  1944. Over and over, kneeling as to pray
  1945.  
  1946. " I'm thanking God with all my heart today,
  1947.  
  1948. Whatever comes " (that was the day he died)
  1949.  
  1950. " I've done my bit to clear the road ahead."
  1951.  
  1952. In those two mothers, common pain of loss
  1953.  
  1954. Blossomed in starry flowers of holy pride,
  1955.  
  1956. What thoughts were hers who silent stood beside
  1957.  
  1958. Her son the dreamer's cross? A 7 . r
  1959.  
  1960. Amelia /. Burr
  1961.  
  1962. Prayer
  1963.  
  1964. I do not ask a truce
  1965.  
  1966. With life's incessant pain;
  1967. But school my lips, O Lord,
  1968.  
  1969. Not to complain.
  1970.  
  1971. I do not ask for peace
  1972.  
  1973. From life's eternal sorrow;
  1974. But give me courage, Lord,
  1975.  
  1976. To fight tomorrow! Peter Gething
  1977.  
  1978.  
  1979.  
  1980. QUOTABLE POEMS 37
  1981.  
  1982.  
  1983.  
  1984. From If Jesus Came Back Today
  1985.  
  1986. If Jesus came back today
  1987.  
  1988. What would the people say?
  1989.  
  1990. Would they cheer Him and strew the way
  1991.  
  1992. With garlands of myrtle and bay
  1993.  
  1994. As they did on that distant day
  1995.  
  1996. When He came to Jerusalem?
  1997.  
  1998. What would America say
  1999.  
  2000. If Jesus came back today?
  2001.  
  2002. We fashion great churches and creeds
  2003. But the heart of the people still bleeds
  2004. And the poor still rot in their needs.
  2005. We display with pride His cross
  2006. In the midst of our pagan life
  2007. While we hug to our hearts the dross
  2008. Of our selfishness and strife.
  2009. What sacrifice have we made
  2010. To live the love He prayed?
  2011. What willing blood have we shed
  2012. To do the deeds He said?
  2013. To be popular and well-fed
  2014. We forsake the way He led
  2015. And follow a ghost instead!
  2016.  
  2017. Vincent Godfrey Burns
  2018.  
  2019. Life's Evening
  2020.  
  2021. Ah, yet, ere I descend to the grave,
  2022. May I a small house and large garden have,
  2023. And a few friends, and many books, both true,
  2024. Both wise, and both delightful too!
  2025.  
  2026. Abraham Cowley
  2027.  
  2028.  
  2029.  
  2030. 38 QUOTABLE POEMS
  2031.  
  2032. Altruism
  2033.  
  2034. " The earth is not the abode of the strong alone; it is also
  2035. the home of the loving." 7. Arthur Thomson.
  2036.  
  2037. The God of things that are
  2038.  
  2039. Is the God of the highest heaven;
  2040. The God of the morning star,
  2041.  
  2042. Of the thrush that sings at even;
  2043. The God of the storm and sunshine,
  2044.  
  2045. Of the wolf, the snail, and the bee,
  2046. Of the Alp's majestic silence,
  2047.  
  2048. Of the boundless depths of the sea;
  2049.  
  2050. The God of the times and the nations,
  2051.  
  2052. Of the planets as they roll,
  2053. Of the numberless constellations,
  2054.  
  2055. Of the limitless human soul.
  2056. For there is nothing small,
  2057.  
  2058. And naught can mighty be;
  2059. Archangels and atoms all
  2060.  
  2061. Embodiments of Thee!
  2062.  
  2063. A single thought divine
  2064.  
  2065. Holds stars and suns in space;
  2066. A dream of man is Thine,
  2067.  
  2068. And history finds its place.
  2069. When the universe was young
  2070.  
  2071. Thine was the perfect thought
  2072. That life should be bound in one
  2073.  
  2074. By the strand of love enwrought
  2075.  
  2076. In the life of the fern and the lily,
  2077.  
  2078. Of the dragon and the dove,
  2079. Still through the stress and struggle
  2080.  
  2081. Waxes the bond of love.
  2082.  
  2083.  
  2084.  
  2085. QUOTABLE POEMS 39
  2086.  
  2087. Out from the ruthless ages
  2088.  
  2089. Rises, like incense mild,
  2090. The love of the man and the woman,
  2091.  
  2092. The love of the mother and child.
  2093.  
  2094. David Starr Jordan
  2095.  
  2096. The Spring of God
  2097.  
  2098. Across the edges of the world there blows a wind
  2099.  
  2100. Mysterious with perfume of a Spring;
  2101.  
  2102. A Spring that is not of the kindling earth,
  2103.  
  2104. That's more than scent of bloom or gleam of bud;
  2105.  
  2106. The Spring of God in flower!
  2107.  
  2108. Down there where neither sun nor air came through,
  2109.  
  2110. I felt it blow dcross my dungeon walls
  2111.  
  2112. The wind before the footsteps of the Lord!
  2113.  
  2114. It bloweth now across the world;
  2115.  
  2116. It strangely stirs the hearts of men; wars cease;
  2117.  
  2118. Rare deeds familiar grow; fastings and prayers,
  2119.  
  2120. Forgiveness, poverty; temples are built
  2121.  
  2122. On visioned impulses, and children march
  2123.  
  2124. On journeys with no end.
  2125.  
  2126. Far off, far off He comes, *
  2127.  
  2128. And we are swept upon our knees
  2129.  
  2130. As meadow grasses kneeling to the wind.
  2131.  
  2132. William A. Percy
  2133. From In April Once "
  2134.  
  2135. From The Vision of Sir Latmfal
  2136.  
  2137. Earth gets its price for what Earth gives us;
  2138.  
  2139. The beggar is taxed for a corner to die in,
  2140. The priest hath his fee who comes and shrives us,
  2141.  
  2142. We bargain for the graves we lie in;
  2143.  
  2144.  
  2145.  
  2146. 40 QUOTABLE POEMS
  2147.  
  2148. At the devil's booth are all things sold,
  2149. Each ounce of dross costs its ounce of gold;
  2150. For a cap and bells our lives we pay,
  2151.  
  2152. Bubbles we buy with a whole soul's tasking;
  2153. 'Tis heaven alone that is given away,
  2154.  
  2155. Tis only God may be had for the asking;
  2156. No price is set on the lavish Summer;
  2157. June may be had by the poorest comer.
  2158.  
  2159. And what is so rare as a day in June?
  2160.  
  2161. Then, if ever, come perfect days;
  2162. Then Heaven tries earth if it be in tune,
  2163.  
  2164. And over it softly her warm ear lays;
  2165. Whether we look, or whether we listen,
  2166. We hear life murmur, or see it glisten;
  2167. Every clod feels a stir of might,
  2168.  
  2169. An instinct within it that reaches and towers,
  2170. And, groping blindly above it for light,
  2171.  
  2172. Climbs to a soul in grass and flowers;
  2173. The flush of life may well be seen
  2174.  
  2175. Thrilling back over hills and valleys;
  2176. The cowslip startles in meadows green,
  2177.  
  2178. The buttercup catches the sun in its chalice,
  2179. And there's never a leaf nor a blade too mean
  2180.  
  2181. To be some happy creature's palace;
  2182. The little bird sits at his door in the sun,
  2183.  
  2184. Atilt like a blossom among the leaves,
  2185. And lets his illumined being o'errun
  2186.  
  2187. With the deluge of summer it receives;
  2188. His mate feels the eggs beneath her wings,
  2189. And the heart in her dumb breast flutters and sings;
  2190. He sings to the wide world and she to her nest
  2191. In the nice ear of Nature, which song is the best?
  2192.  
  2193. James Russell Lowell
  2194.  
  2195.  
  2196.  
  2197. QUOTABLE POEMS 41
  2198.  
  2199.  
  2200.  
  2201. Loyalties
  2202.  
  2203. Let us keep splendid loyalties,
  2204.  
  2205. For we are falling prey to lesser things.
  2206.  
  2207. What use are breath and strength if we no longer feel
  2208.  
  2209. The thrill of battle for some holy cause
  2210.  
  2211. Or hear high morning bugles calling us away?
  2212.  
  2213. Let brave hearts dare to break the truce with things
  2214.  
  2215. Ere we have lost our ancient heritage.
  2216.  
  2217. Are we to gain a world to lose our souls,
  2218.  
  2219. Souls which can keep faith until death
  2220.  
  2221. And die, triumphant, in some crimson dawn?
  2222.  
  2223. Nay, we must keep faith with the unnumbered brave
  2224.  
  2225. Who pushed aside horizons, that we might reach
  2226.  
  2227. The better things: We cannot rest until
  2228.  
  2229. We have put courage once more on her throne;
  2230.  
  2231. For Honor clamors for her heritage,
  2232.  
  2233. And Right still claims a kingdom of its own.
  2234.  
  2235. Walter A. Cutter
  2236.  
  2237. God Is Here
  2238.  
  2239. God is here! I hear His voice
  2240.  
  2241. While thrushes make the woods rejoice.
  2242.  
  2243. I touch His robe each time I place
  2244. My hand against a pansy's face.
  2245.  
  2246. I breathe His breath if I but pass
  2247. Verbenas trailing through the grass.
  2248.  
  2249. God is here! From every tree
  2250. His leafy fingers beckon me.
  2251.  
  2252. Madeleine Aaron
  2253.  
  2254.  
  2255.  
  2256. 42 QUOTABLE POEMS
  2257.  
  2258.  
  2259.  
  2260. I Tramp a Perpetual Journey
  2261.  
  2262. I tramp a perpetual journey,
  2263.  
  2264. My signs are a rain-proof coat, good shoes, and a staff cut
  2265.  
  2266. from the woods,
  2267.  
  2268. No friend of mine takes his ease in my chair,
  2269. I have no chair, no church, no philosophy,
  2270. I lead no man to a dinner-table, library or exchange,
  2271. But each man and each woman of you I lead upon a knoll,
  2272. My left hand hooking you round the waist,
  2273. My right hand pointing to landscapes of continents, and a
  2274.  
  2275. plain public road.
  2276.  
  2277. Not I nor anyone else, can travel that road for you,
  2278. You must travel it for yourself.
  2279.  
  2280. Walt Whitman
  2281. From " Leaves of Grass "
  2282.  
  2283.  
  2284.  
  2285. Worship
  2286.  
  2287. Work is devout, and service is divine.
  2288.  
  2289. Who stoops to scrub a floor
  2290.  
  2291. May worship more
  2292.  
  2293. Than he who kneels before a holy shrine;
  2294.  
  2295. Who crushes stubborn ore
  2296.  
  2297. More worthily adore
  2298.  
  2299. Than he who crushes sacramental wine.
  2300.  
  2301. Roy Campbell MacFie
  2302.  
  2303. The Seven Ages of Man
  2304.  
  2305. All the world's a stage,
  2306. And all the men and women merely players:
  2307. They have their exits and their entrances;
  2308. And one man in his time plays many parts,
  2309.  
  2310.  
  2311.  
  2312. QUOTABLE POEMS 43
  2313.  
  2314. His acts being seven ages. As, first, the infant,
  2315. Mewling and puking in the nurse's arms:
  2316. And then the whining schoolboy, with his satchel
  2317. And shining morning face, creeping like snail
  2318. Unwillingly to school: And then the lover,
  2319. Sighing like furnace, with a woeful ballad
  2320. Made to his mistress' eyebrow: Then the soldier,
  2321. Full of strange oaths, and bearded like the pard,
  2322. Jealous in honor, sudden and quick in quarrel,
  2323. Seeking the bubble reputation
  2324. Even in the cannon's mouth: And then the justice,
  2325. In fair round belly with good capon lined,
  2326. With eyes severe and beard of formal cut,
  2327. Full of wise saws and modern instances;
  2328. And so he plays his part: The sixth age shifts
  2329. Into the lean and slipper'd pantaloon,
  2330. With spectacles on nose and pouch on side;
  2331. His youthful hose, well saved, a world too wide
  2332. For his shrunk shank; and his big manly voice,
  2333. Turning again toward childish treble, pipes
  2334. And whistles in his sound: Last scene of all,
  2335. That ends this strange eventful history,
  2336. Is second childishness and mere oblivion,
  2337. Sans teeth, sans eyes, sans taste, sans everything.
  2338.  
  2339. William Shakespeare
  2340. From " As You Like It "
  2341.  
  2342.  
  2343.  
  2344. From Among the Ferns
  2345.  
  2346. I lay among the ferns,
  2347.  
  2348. Where they lifted their fronds, innumerable, in the green-
  2349. wood wilderness, like wings winnowing the air;
  2350. And their voices went by me continually.
  2351.  
  2352.  
  2353.  
  2354. 44 QUOTABLE POEMS
  2355.  
  2356. And I listened, and Lo! softly inaudibly raining I heard not
  2357. the voices of the ferns only, but of all living creatures:
  2358.  
  2359. Voices of mountain and star,
  2360.  
  2361. Of cloud and forest and ocean,
  2362.  
  2363. And of little rills tumbling among the rocks,
  2364.  
  2365. And of the high tops where the moss-beds are and the springs
  2366. arise.
  2367.  
  2368. As the wind at midday rains whitening over the grass,
  2369.  
  2370. As the night-bird glimmers a moment, fleeting between the
  2371. lonely watcher and the moon,
  2372.  
  2373. So softly inaudibly they rained,
  2374.  
  2375. While I sat silent.
  2376.  
  2377. And in the silence of the greenwood I knew the secret of the
  2378.  
  2379. growth of the ferns;
  2380. I saw their delicate leaflets tremble breathing an unde-
  2381.  
  2382. scribed and unuttered life;
  2383. And, below, the ocean lay sleeping;
  2384. And round them the mountains and the stars dawned in
  2385.  
  2386. glad companionship forever.
  2387.  
  2388. Edward Carpenter
  2389.  
  2390.  
  2391.  
  2392. The Newer Vainglory
  2393.  
  2394. Two men went up to pray; and one gave thanks,
  2395.  
  2396. Not with himself aloud,
  2397. With proclamation, calling on the ranks
  2398.  
  2399. Of an attentive crowd.
  2400.  
  2401.  
  2402.  
  2403. " Thank God, I clap not my own humble breast,
  2404.  
  2405. But other ruffians' backs,
  2406. Imputing crime such is my tolerant haste
  2407.  
  2408. To any man that lacks.
  2409.  
  2410.  
  2411.  
  2412. QUOTABLE POEMS 45
  2413.  
  2414. " For I am tolerant, generous, keep no rules,
  2415.  
  2416. And the age honors me.
  2417. Thank God I am not as these rigid fools,
  2418.  
  2419. Even as this Pharisee."
  2420.  
  2421. Alice Meynell
  2422.  
  2423.  
  2424.  
  2425. The Place of Peace
  2426.  
  2427. At the heart of the cyclone tearing the sky
  2428.  
  2429. And flinging the clouds and the towers by,
  2430.  
  2431. Is a place of central calm;
  2432.  
  2433. So here in the roar of mortal things,
  2434.  
  2435. I have a place where my spirit sings,
  2436.  
  2437. In the hollow of God's palm.
  2438.  
  2439. Edwin Markham
  2440.  
  2441.  
  2442.  
  2443. The Seeker After God
  2444.  
  2445. There was a dreamer once, whose spirit trod
  2446. Unnumbered ways in thwarted search for God:
  2447. He stirred the dust on ancient books; he sought
  2448. For certain light in what the teachers taught;
  2449. He took his staff and went unto the Wise,
  2450. And deeper darkness fell about his eyes;
  2451. He lived a hermit, and forebore his food,
  2452. And God left visitless his solitude;
  2453. He wrapped himself in prayer night after night,
  2454. And mocking demons danced across his sight.
  2455. Resigned at last to Him he could not find,
  2456. He turned again to live among mankind
  2457. And when from man he no more stood apart,
  2458. God, on that instant, visited his heart!
  2459.  
  2460. Harry Kemp
  2461.  
  2462.  
  2463.  
  2464. 46 QUOTABLE POEMS
  2465.  
  2466.  
  2467.  
  2468. The Survivor
  2469.  
  2470. When the last day is ended,
  2471.  
  2472. And the nights are through;
  2473. When the last sun is buried
  2474.  
  2475. In its grave of blue;
  2476.  
  2477. When the stars are snuffed like candles,
  2478.  
  2479. And the seas no longer fret;
  2480. When the winds unlearn their cunning,
  2481.  
  2482. And the storms forget;
  2483.  
  2484. When the last lip is palsied,
  2485.  
  2486. And the last prayer said;
  2487. Love shall reign immortal
  2488.  
  2489. While the worlds lie dead!
  2490.  
  2491. Frederic Lawrence Knowles
  2492.  
  2493.  
  2494.  
  2495. Choice
  2496.  
  2497. Ask and it shall be given.
  2498.  
  2499. Ask ask.
  2500.  
  2501. And if you ask a stone
  2502.  
  2503. Expect not bread;
  2504.  
  2505. And if the stone glitter like a caught star,
  2506.  
  2507. And shine on a warm, soft breast,
  2508.  
  2509. And you have tossed your soul away
  2510.  
  2511. To see it in that nest,
  2512.  
  2513. Yet is it still a stone not bread.
  2514.  
  2515. Seek and you shall find.
  2516. Seek seek.
  2517.  
  2518. And if you go the crowded street
  2519. Look not to find the hills;
  2520.  
  2521.  
  2522.  
  2523. QUOTABLE POEMS 47
  2524.  
  2525. And if the shops sit gay along the way,
  2526. And laughter fills the air,
  2527. Still you have lost the hills.
  2528.  
  2529. Knock and the door shall open.
  2530. Knock knock.
  2531. Two doors are there, beware!
  2532. Think well before you knock;
  2533. Your tapping finger will unlock
  2534. Your heaven or hell.
  2535.  
  2536. Ellen Coit Elliott
  2537.  
  2538.  
  2539.  
  2540. Past Ruined Hion
  2541.  
  2542. Past ruined Hion Helen lives,
  2543.  
  2544. Alcestis rises from the shades;
  2545. Verse calls them forth; 'tis verse that gives
  2546.  
  2547. Immortal youth to mortal maids.
  2548.  
  2549. Soon shall Oblivion's deepening veil
  2550.  
  2551. Hide all the peopled hills you see,
  2552. The gay, the proud, while lovers hail
  2553.  
  2554. These many summers you and me.
  2555.  
  2556. Walter Savage Landor
  2557.  
  2558.  
  2559.  
  2560. Nature and Religion
  2561.  
  2562. Where shall we get religion? Beneath the open sky,
  2563.  
  2564. The sphere of crystal silence surcharged with deity.
  2565.  
  2566. The winds blow from a thousand ways and waft their balms
  2567.  
  2568. abroad,
  2569. The winds blow toward a million goals but all winds
  2570.  
  2571. blow from God.
  2572.  
  2573.  
  2574.  
  2575. 48 QUOTABLE POEMS
  2576.  
  2577. The stars the old Chaldeans saw still weave their maze
  2578.  
  2579. on high
  2580.  
  2581. And write a thousand thousand years their bible in the sky.
  2582. The midnight earth sends incense up, sweet with the breath
  2583.  
  2584. of prayer
  2585. Go out beneath the naked night and get religion there.
  2586.  
  2587. Where shall we get religion? Beneath the blooming tree,
  2588. Beside the hill-encircled brooks that loiter to the sea;
  2589. Beside all twilight waters, beneath the noonday shades.
  2590. Beneath the dark cathedral pines, and through the tangled
  2591.  
  2592. glades;
  2593.  
  2594. Wherever the old urge of life provokes the dumb, dead sod
  2595. To tell its thought in violets, the soul takes hold on God.
  2596. Go smell the growing clover, and scent the blooming pear,
  2597. Go forth to seek religion and find it anywhere.
  2598.  
  2599. Sam Walter Foss
  2600.  
  2601.  
  2602.  
  2603. Thanksgiving
  2604.  
  2605. For all things beautiful, and good, and true;
  2606.  
  2607. For things that seemed not good yet turned to good;
  2608.  
  2609. For all the sweet compulsions of Thy will
  2610.  
  2611. That chastened, tried, and wrought us to Thy shape;
  2612.  
  2613. For things unnumbered that we take of right,
  2614.  
  2615. And value first when they are withheld;
  2616.  
  2617. For light and air; sweet sense of sound and smell;
  2618.  
  2619. For ears to hear the heavenly harmonies;
  2620.  
  2621. For eyes to see the unseen in the seen;
  2622.  
  2623. For vision of the Worker in the work;
  2624.  
  2625. For hearts to apprehend Thee everywhere;
  2626.  
  2627. We thank Thee, Lord.
  2628.  
  2629. John Oxenkam
  2630.  
  2631.  
  2632.  
  2633. QUOTABLE POEMS 49
  2634.  
  2635.  
  2636.  
  2637. Magna Est Veritas
  2638.  
  2639. Here, in this little Bay,
  2640.  
  2641. Full of tumultuous life and great repose,
  2642.  
  2643. Where, twice a day,
  2644.  
  2645. The purposeless, glad ocean comes and goes,
  2646.  
  2647. Under high cliffs, and far from the huge town,
  2648.  
  2649. I sit me down.
  2650.  
  2651. For want of me the world's course will not fail;
  2652.  
  2653. When all its work is done, the lie shall rot;
  2654.  
  2655. The truth is great, and shall prevail,
  2656.  
  2657. When none cares whether it prevail or not.
  2658.  
  2659. Coventry Patmore
  2660.  
  2661.  
  2662.  
  2663. Beauty
  2664.  
  2665. How can you smile when pain is everywhere;
  2666. How flaunt complacently your vulgar wealth?
  2667. " It is my duty to be gay. My health
  2668. And calm delight the eye and banish care
  2669. It would be sad indeed if none were free
  2670. To sanction Beauty and embody Joy.
  2671. Enough of you, who would with gloom destroy
  2672. My grace. I do my share of Charity! "
  2673.  
  2674. Your share of charity! Who tipped the scales
  2675. To Sophistry and weighed a fancy gown
  2676. Against a street rat's need of bread? The nails
  2677. Of Calvary, the cross, the thorned crown,
  2678. The face of sorrow that He wore, reply:
  2679. " Forgive them, God, they know not when they lie! "
  2680.  
  2681. Mary Craig Sinclair
  2682.  
  2683.  
  2684.  
  2685. SO QUOTABLE POEMS
  2686.  
  2687.  
  2688.  
  2689. Lone-Land
  2690.  
  2691. Around us lies a world invisible,
  2692.  
  2693. With isles of dream and many a continent
  2694.  
  2695. Of Thought, and Isthmus Fancy, where we dwell
  2696.  
  2697. Each as a lonely wanderer intent
  2698.  
  2699. Upon his vision; finding each his fears
  2700.  
  2701. And hopes encompassed by the tide of Tears.
  2702.  
  2703. John B. Tabb
  2704.  
  2705.  
  2706.  
  2707. My Enemy
  2708.  
  2709. An enemy I had, whose mien
  2710.  
  2711. I stoutly strove in vain to know;
  2712. For hard he dogged my steps, unseen,
  2713.  
  2714. Wherever I might go.
  2715.  
  2716. My plans he balked; my aims he foiled;
  2717.  
  2718. He blocked my every onward way.
  2719. When for some lofty goal I toiled,
  2720.  
  2721. He grimly said me nay.
  2722.  
  2723. " Come forth! " I cried, " Lay bare thy guise!
  2724.  
  2725. Thy wretched features I would see."
  2726. Yet always to my straining eyes
  2727.  
  2728. He dwelt in mystery.
  2729.  
  2730. Until one night I held him fast,
  2731.  
  2732. The veil from off his form did draw;
  2733. I gazed upon his face at last
  2734.  
  2735. And, lo! myself I saw.
  2736.  
  2737. Edwin L. Sabin
  2738.  
  2739.  
  2740.  
  2741. QUOTABLE POEMS 51
  2742.  
  2743.  
  2744.  
  2745. Memory
  2746.  
  2747. My mind lets go a thousand things,
  2748. Like dates of wars and deaths of kings,
  2749. And yet recalls the very hour
  2750. J Twas noon by yonder village tower,
  2751. And on the last blue noon in May
  2752. The wind came briskly up this way,
  2753. Crisping the brook beside the road;
  2754. Then, pausing here, set down its load
  2755. Of pine-scents, and shook listlessly
  2756. Two petals from that wild-rose tree.
  2757.  
  2758. Thomas Bailey Aldrich
  2759.  
  2760. Pass On the Torch
  2761.  
  2762. Pass on the torch, pass on the flame;
  2763. Remember whence the Glory came;
  2764. And eyes are on you as you run,
  2765. Beyond the shining of the sun.
  2766.  
  2767. Lord Christ, we take the torch from Thee;
  2768. We must be true, we must be free,
  2769. And clean of heart and strong of soul,
  2770. To bear the Glory to its goal.
  2771.  
  2772. America, God hear the prayer
  2773. America for God, we dare,
  2774. With Lincoln's heart and Lincoln's hand,
  2775. To fling a flame across the land.
  2776.  
  2777. O Lord of life, to Thee we kneel;
  2778. Maker of men, our purpose seall
  2779. We will, for honor of Thy Name,
  2780. Pass on the Torch, pass on the flame.
  2781.  
  2782. Allen Eastman Cross
  2783.  
  2784.  
  2785.  
  2786. 52 QUOTABLE POEMS
  2787.  
  2788.  
  2789.  
  2790. The Miser
  2791.  
  2792. I have wasted nothing. O Lord, I have saved,
  2793.  
  2794. Saved, put by in a goodly hoard.
  2795.  
  2796. What of the prodigals? Judge them, Lord
  2797.  
  2798. Their wanton waste of Thy mercies poured
  2799.  
  2800. Into the sewers! Profligates!
  2801.  
  2802. Judge them, Lord, in Thy righteous wrath.
  2803.  
  2804. I have saved, O Lord, I have scraped and saved,
  2805.  
  2806. With my eyes downbent to my daily path;
  2807.  
  2808. I have counted and carried, checked and stored,
  2809.  
  2810. Nothing too worthless, nothing too small,
  2811.  
  2812. Never a fragment thrown away
  2813.  
  2814. A gainful use I have found for all.
  2815.  
  2816. But what is my store? Do they call this Death,
  2817. This poignant insight? At last I see.
  2818. I have wasted nothing, Lord, but life,
  2819. Time, and the talent Thou gavest me.
  2820.  
  2821. Laura Bell Everett
  2822.  
  2823.  
  2824.  
  2825. Whichever Way the Wind Doth Blow
  2826.  
  2827. Whichever way the wind doth blow
  2828. Some heart is glad to have it so;
  2829. Then blow it east or blow it west,
  2830. The wind that blows, that wind is best.
  2831.  
  2832.  
  2833.  
  2834. My little craft sails not alone;
  2835. A thousand fleets from every zone
  2836. Are out upon a thousand seas;
  2837. And what for me were favouring breeze
  2838.  
  2839.  
  2840.  
  2841. QUOTABLE POEMS S3
  2842.  
  2843. Might dash another, with the shock
  2844. Of doom, upon some hidden rock.
  2845. And so I do not dare to pray
  2846. For winds to waft me on my way,
  2847. But leave it to a Higher Will
  2848. To stay or speed me; trusting still
  2849. That all is well, and sure that He
  2850. Who launched my bark will sail with me
  2851. Through storm and calm, and will not fail
  2852. Whatever breezes may prevail
  2853. To land me, every peril past,
  2854. Within His sheltering Heaven at last.
  2855.  
  2856. Then whatsoever wind doth blow,
  2857. My heart is glad to have it so;
  2858. And blow it east or blow it west,
  2859. The wind that blows, that wind is best,
  2860.  
  2861. Caroline Atherton Mason
  2862.  
  2863.  
  2864.  
  2865. The Tide of Faith
  2866.  
  2867. So faith is strong
  2868.  
  2869. Only when we are strong, shrinks when we shrink.
  2870.  
  2871. It comes when music stirs us, and the chords,
  2872.  
  2873. Moving on some grand climax, shake our souls
  2874.  
  2875. With influx new that makes new energies.
  2876.  
  2877. It comes in swellings of the heart and tears
  2878.  
  2879. That rise at noble and at gentle deeds.
  2880.  
  2881. It comes in moments of heroic love,
  2882.  
  2883. Un jealous joy in joy not made for us;
  2884.  
  2885. In conscious triumph of the good within,
  2886.  
  2887. Making us worship goodness that rebukes.
  2888.  
  2889. Even our failures are a prophecy,
  2890.  
  2891. Even our yearnings and our bitter tears
  2892.  
  2893.  
  2894.  
  2895. 54 QUOTABLE POEMS
  2896.  
  2897. After that fair and true we cannot grasp.
  2898. Presentiment of better things on earth
  2899. Sweeps in with every force that stirs our souls
  2900. To admiration, self-renouncing love.
  2901.  
  2902. George Eliot
  2903.  
  2904. Vitse Summa Brevis
  2905.  
  2906. They are not long, the weeping and the laughter,
  2907.  
  2908. Love and desire and hate:
  2909. I think they have no portion in us after
  2910.  
  2911. We pass the gate.
  2912. They are not long, the days of wine and roses:
  2913.  
  2914. Out of a misty dream
  2915. Our path emerges for a while, then closes
  2916.  
  2917. Within a dream.
  2918.  
  2919. Ernest Dowson
  2920.  
  2921. From Ulysses
  2922.  
  2923. There lies the port; the vessel puffs her sail:
  2924.  
  2925. There gloom the dark broad seas. My mariners,
  2926.  
  2927. Souls that have toil'd, and wrought, and thought with me
  2928.  
  2929. That ever with a frolic welcome took
  2930.  
  2931. The thunder and the sunshine, and opposed
  2932.  
  2933. Free hearts, free foreheads you and I are old;
  2934.  
  2935. Old age hath yet his honor and his toil;
  2936.  
  2937. Death closes all: but something ere the end,
  2938.  
  2939. Some work of noble note, may yet be done,
  2940.  
  2941. Not unbecoming men that strove with gods.
  2942.  
  2943. The lights begin to twinkle from the rocks:
  2944.  
  2945. The long day wanes: the slow moon climbs: the deep
  2946.  
  2947. Moans round with many voices. Come, my friends,
  2948.  
  2949. Tis not too late to seek a newer world.
  2950.  
  2951. Push off, and sitting well in order smite
  2952.  
  2953.  
  2954.  
  2955. QUOTABLE POEMS 55
  2956.  
  2957. The sounding furrows; for my purpose holds
  2958.  
  2959. To sail beyond the sunset, and the baths
  2960.  
  2961. Of all the western stars, until I die.
  2962.  
  2963. It may be that the gulfs will wash us down:
  2964.  
  2965. It may be we shall touch the Happy Isles,
  2966.  
  2967. And see the great Achilles, whom we knew.
  2968.  
  2969. Tho' much is taken, much abides; and tho'
  2970.  
  2971. We are not now that strength which in old days
  2972.  
  2973. Moved earth and heaven, that which we are, we are;
  2974.  
  2975. One equal temper of heroic hearts,
  2976.  
  2977. Made weak by time and fate, but strong in will
  2978.  
  2979. To strive, to seek, to find, and not to yield.
  2980.  
  2981. Alfred Tennyson
  2982.  
  2983. Invincible
  2984.  
  2985. The years race by on padded feet
  2986. Unhaltingly, and panther-fleet
  2987. Imprinting marks of drab decay.
  2988.  
  2989. My hair grows ashen; cravings numb;
  2990. Lips pale; and telltale age-lines come
  2991. Life's hoary touch I may not stay.
  2992.  
  2993. Time-scarred . . . yet I shall scorn to weep
  2994. For transient youth if I can keep
  2995. My piquant heart from turning gray!
  2996.  
  2997. Winnie Lynch Rockett
  2998.  
  2999.  
  3000.  
  3001. Rules for the Road
  3002.  
  3003. Stand straight:
  3004.  
  3005. Step firmly, throw your weight:
  3006.  
  3007. The heaven is high above your head,
  3008.  
  3009. The good gray road is faithful to your tread.
  3010.  
  3011.  
  3012.  
  3013. 56 QUOTABLE POEMS
  3014.  
  3015. Be strong:
  3016.  
  3017. Sing to your heart a battle song:
  3018. Though hidden f oemen lie in wait,
  3019. Something is in you that can smile at Fate,
  3020.  
  3021. Press through:
  3022.  
  3023. Nothing can harm if you are true.
  3024.  
  3025. And when the night comes, rest:
  3026.  
  3027. The earth is friendly as a mother's breast.
  3028.  
  3029. Edwin Markham
  3030.  
  3031.  
  3032.  
  3033. The White Christs
  3034.  
  3035. The White Christs come from the East,
  3036.  
  3037. And they follow the way of the sun;
  3038. And they smile, as Pale Men ask them to
  3039.  
  3040. At the things Pale Men have done;
  3041. For the White Christs sanction the sum of things
  3042.  
  3043. Faggot and club and gun.
  3044.  
  3045. Whine of the groaning car,
  3046.  
  3047. Caste, which divides like a wall;
  3048. Curse of the raw-sored soul;
  3049.  
  3050. Doom of the great and small;
  3051. The White Christs fashioned by Pale White Men
  3052.  
  3053. Sanction and bless it all.
  3054.  
  3055. Prophets of truth have said
  3056.  
  3057. That Afric and Ind must mourn;
  3058. And the children of Oman weep
  3059.  
  3060. Trampled and slashed and torn,
  3061. Keeping the watch with brown Cathay
  3062.  
  3063. Till the Black Christs shall be born.
  3064.  
  3065. Guy Fitch Phelps
  3066.  
  3067.  
  3068.  
  3069. QUOTABLE POEMS 57
  3070.  
  3071.  
  3072.  
  3073. Prayer for a Little Home
  3074.  
  3075. God send us a little home
  3076. To come back to when we roam
  3077. Low walls and fluted tiles
  3078. Wide windows, a view for miles;
  3079. Red firelight and dee

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